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Universiteit Hasselt - Knowledge in action

COURSE NORTH-SOUTH (1955): ‘2016, A WORLD IN TRANSITION'



 

2016, a world in transition

The interdisciplinary course North South consists of a series of lectures by experts on North-South relations. It covers a variety of contemporary social topics including social policy, education, law, international politics, health, agriculture, economics and management, architecture and planning, etc. The course exposes students to a plurality of perspectives on local and global societal challenges at a time of unprecedented globalisation. It aims at providing a broader and deeper understanding of contemporary global issues and to develop students’ knowledge as well as a (self-)reflective and respectful perspective on other cultures.

After the Millennium Development Goals in 2015, the United Nations have launched the Sustainable Development Goals. The course includes lectures by selected experts who will introduce you to relevant development issues in different societal fields. The lectures will deal with development challenges ranging from the role of finance in addressing development goals worldwide to the current refugee crisis, the containment of infectious diseases, energy supply leapfrogging, the key role of women in peacebuilding and conflict, and Brasil as a social and economic world power.

This course is an elective course open to all students and interested people (free of charge).


Thursday 11 February 2016

The European 'refugee crisis': Questioning assumptions about unauthorised migration

Prof. Vicki Squire (Warwick University, UK)

Thursday 18 February 2016

How to finance sustainable development in the 21st century? An agenda for inclusive financial reform

Jan Van De Poel (Policy officer on development finance, 11.11.11)

Thursday 25 February 2016

Immunization challenges in low and middle income countries (LMIC)

Prof. dr. Pierre Van Damme (University of Antwerp, Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute)

Followed by a debate with:

- Prof. dr. Niel Hens (Hasselt University)

- TBA

Thursday 3 March 2016

Gender, peace and security: rethinking peacebuilding in the 21st century

Dr. Sahla Aroussi (Coventry University, UK)

Thursday 10 March 2016

Energy supply leapfrogging

Alex De Broe (CEO XANT)

Wednesday 16 March 2016

World Evening (Cultural evening with appetizers and workshops from all over the world)
More info on www.uhasselt.be/Worldevening!

Thursday 17 March 2016

The Brazilian current scenario as a consequence of a historical process: the potentialities and the weaknesses of a shifting State

Prof. Pedro Ivo Diniz (Universidade Federal de Lavras, Brasil)


Academic coordination

Prof. dr. Patrizia Zanoni
Prof. dr. Paul Janssen

Administrative coordination

Lia Van Hoef
Lieselot Peeters

Thursday 11 February 2016: The European 'refugee crisis': Questioning assumptions about unauthorised migration by Prof. Vicki Squire (Warwick University, UK)

This talk will reflect on the current European migration or 'refugee crisis'. Specifically, this 'crisis' will be examined in the context of a broader global and historical power dynamics, which condition unauthorised migrations and which are integral in understanding the way in which the 'crisis' has both emerged and been addressed. The talk will give an overview of the 'crisis' in its longer duration, as well as emphasising the diversity of recent migratory journeys and experiences. Drawing on the findings of a new research project that is based on in-depth qualitative interviews with new arrivals in Kos (Greece), Sicily (Italy) and Malta, the project will shed light on and question a range of assumptions about unauthorised migration. In doing so, it will put forward proposals for policy development in terms that do not simply 'solve a crisis', but that can transform the conditions under which such a crisis emerges in the first place.

Short bio

Dr Vicki Squire is Associate Professor of International Security at the Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (V.J.Squire@warwick.ac.uk). She is Principal Investigator on the ESRC urgent research project Crossing the Mediterranean Sea by Boat, and on the Leverhulme Fellowship Human Dignity and Biophysical Violence. She has written three books and over thirty journal articles and book chapters in the area of border and migration politics, and he rmost recent publication is Post/humanitarian Border Politics between Mexico and the US (Palgrave, 2015).

Thursday 18 February 2016: How to finance sustainable development in the 21st century? An agenda for inclusive financial reform by Jan Van de Poel (Policy officer on development finance, 11.11.11)

In september 2015, the governments of all the world's nations assembled at a special summit on sustainable development in New York to agree on an ambitious agenda 'to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet'. Few weeks before, in July, those same governments gathered in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) to discuss measures to align financing flows and policies with economic social and environmental priorities. The Addis Ababa Action Agenda discusses a wide range of issues such as foreign aid, debt, domestic resources from taxation, illicit flows and tax avoidance, private investment and trade. This session will make a critical assessment of this new framework for financing sutainable development: Is it really 'new'? Is it really 'transformative'? What alternative measures are needed to address current constraints to sustainable development? What can and should be done?

Thursday 25 February 2016: Immunization challenges in low and middle income countries (LMIC) by Prof. dr. Pierre Van Damme (Antwerp University, Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute, Centre for the Evaluation of Vaccination, Belgium)

Followed by a debate with e.g. Prof. dr. Niel Hens (Hasselt University)

 

Guaranteeing high immunization coverage and successful introduction of new vaccines in low and middle income countries (LMIC) is not evident, nor is it in high income countries. SAGE (the strategic advisory group of experts on immunization) gathers twice a year at the WHO Headquarters in Geneva to agree on the tools to further control and eradicate polio, to review immunization programmes in the 6 WHO regions in the world and to discuss ways to increase immunization coverage.

 

This session will present many challenges of universal immunization programmes in the world: cost, logistics, programmatic issues, priority setting, political will and vaccine hesitancy are some of the many challenges in LMIC that will be addressed. The students will become familiar with the issue of polio eradication: is polio eradicated? By when? And what still needs to be done? Finally, issues related to the ebola vaccine studies will be reviewed.

Thursday 03 March 2016: Gender, peace and security: rethinking peacebuilding in the 21st century by Dr. Sahla Aroussi (Coventry University, UK)

Numerous feminist studies have highlighted the gendered nature of war and peace. During conflicts, gender harms are extensive and include sexual, physical, economic and structural violence. Women are also generally excluded from formal peace negotiations and decision-making circles and their priorities are often overlooked during peacemaking and peacebuilding processes. The adoption of the Security Council resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security in October 2000 signalled an understanding at the highest level of the United Nations that building inclusive and sustainable peace necessarily requires understanding and transforming the gendered power dynamics within societies during conflict and transition. Resolution 1325 formally requires political transition to be safe, gender sensitive and transformative for women. This lecture will first study the experience of women during armed conflict and transition. It will then critically reflect on the gendered perceptions of war, violence and peacebuilding. In its final section, the lecture will explore the UN agenda on Women, Peace and Security and study the progress achieved over the last fifteen years since its adoption.

Short bio

Dr Sahla Aroussi is a Research Associate at the Centre for Trust, Peace & Social Relations at Coventry University, UK. She holds a Ph.D. in Politics (2011) and an LLM Transnational Justice (2007) from the University of Ulster and an MA Human Rights and Democratisation (2004) from the University of Malta. Aroussi previously worked as a lecturer at the University of Ulster and a Postdoctoral researcher in the University of Antwerp's Law and Development research group. Aroussi's research interests lie in the field of gender and conflict particularly: the UN's agenda on Women, Peace and Security; peace agreements; transitional justice; wartime sexual violence; and, gender equality in transitional societies.

Thursday 10 March 2016: Energy supply leapfrogging by Alex De Broe (CEO XANT)

Access to a reliable and affordable electricity supply is considered to be an important accelerator of economic development and improvement of living standards.
Energy poverty, the various approaches of tackling it and the technologies introduced to do this are the topic of my contribution to the North-South program.
We will investigate how rural electrification has been done in the past and whether it has led to the desired results.
The new paradigm shift of introducing distributed energy systems,  rather than extending centralized grids, will be discussed together with various actors and technologies to make this happen.   
XANT contributes to sustainable rural electrification by providing robust wind turbines suitable for application in isolated locations.
Some typical projects will be highlighted to further illustrate the role and ambition of XANT.

Thursday 17 March 2016: The Brazilian current scenario as a consequence of a historical process: the potentialities and the weaknesses of a shifting State by Prof. dr. Pedro Ivo Diniz (Universidade Federal de Lavras, Brasil)

The purpose of this lecture is to analyse the current context of the Brazilian society as a result of a historical process. The current economic and political tension will be contextualised as a part of a wider scenario of social transformations that involve the perspectives since the democratisation of the Brasilian State. In this sense, the lecture will address the changes that led Brasil from being considered a "miracle of growth" in the 70s through a period of instability in the 80s, achieving a significant reduction of inequalities in the following decades and culminating in a fragile arrangement in which its potentialities seem to succumb to the exposure of its weaknesses. It is intended ultimately to understand the current situation as a stage in the evolution of this young democracy that seeks to consolidate itself as one of the world's greatest but, to achieve this, must first "deal with its wounds".

Structure and language
The course consists of interactive lectures by guest speakers specialised in different areas of study. Every lecture will foresee the possibility of interaction between the speaker and the audience. All lectures will be taught in English.

Time and location
All lectures will take place from 5 to 7pm  in Room H2 - Hasselt University (campus Diepenbeek) Agoralaan (building D) 3590, Diepenbeek.

Target group

  • AUHL students:
    • Hasselt University: Students in their third bachelor year as well as master students can register for the course (1955) with the approval of their faculty
    • PXL: Students can subscribe for the course if it has been approved by their department
  • Others: The lectures are open to all interested people

Examination

  • Attendance at all lectures is required!
  • Participation in the discussions during the lectures are encouraged.
  • Students can choose between:
    • A 10-page essay concerning a topic which has been dealt with during the lectures. Students frame this topic within a broader perspective, adopt a critical stance in formulating their own opinion and make links to recent events on the topic.
    • Oral examination: students read a book from a given reading list and discuss 3 insights they gained from this book.

Exam instructions
Literature list

Contact: 
Lia Van Hoef
Lieselot Peeters

0. Introductory presentation

1. The European 'refugee crisis': Questioning assumptions about unauthorised migration by Prof. Vicki Squire (Warwick University, UK) on 11.02.2016

2. How to finance sustainable development in the 21st century? An agenda for inclusive financial reform by Jan Van de Poel (11.11.11) on 18.02.2016

3. Immunization challenges in low and middle income countries by Prof. dr. Pierre Van Damme (University of Antwerp) on 25.02.2016

4. Gender, peace and security: rethinking peacebuilding in the 21st century by dr. Sahla Aroussi (Coventry University, UK) on 03.03.2016

5. Energy Supply Leapfrogging by Alex De Broe (CEO XANT) on 10.03.2016

6. The Brazilian current scenario as a consequence of a historical process: the potentialities and the weaknesses of a shifting state by Prof. dr. Pedro Ivo Diniz (Universidade Federal de Lavras, Brazil) on 17.03.2016