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Behavior symposium


PhD symposium

Logo UHasselt Universiteit Hasselt - Knowledge in action

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR, A 'PERFECT' READ-OUT OF THE HUMAN FUNCTIONING BRAIN

This symposium focuses on animal behavior and its translation to humans. Different animal models will be discussed, including models for stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and dopamine research.

Speakers

  • Arthur Liesz | LMU Munich, Germany
  • Robin Lemmens | VIB Leuven, Belgium
  • Andrew Knight | University of Winchester, UK
  • Debby Van Dam | UAntwerpen, Belgium
  • Dr. Tim Vanmierlo | UHasselt, Belgium
  • Mark Ungless | Imperial College London, UK
  • Wim Vanduffel | KU Leuven, Belgium

Program September 28th

08.30 - 09.30 Registration and coffee
09.30 – 09.45 Opening
09.45 – 11.15 Keynote session 1: “Stroke research”
  • Dr. Arthur Liesz - LMU Munich, Germany
    The immunology of stroke: bench-to-bed translation and back
  • Prof. Dr. Robin Lemmens - VIB Leuven, Belgium
    Translating stroke recovery from mouse to man
11.15 - 11.45 Coffee break
11.45 – 12.30 Plenary lecture: “Ethical issues”
  • Prof. Dr. Andrew Knight - University of Winchester, UK
    Systematic reviews of animal experiments demonstrate poor contributions to human healthcare
12.30 – 14.00 Lunch break and poster session
14.00 – 15.30 Keynote session 2: “Alzheimer research”
  • Dr. Debby Van Dam - UAntwerpen, Belgium
    Animal models of dementia: hopes and hurdles in translating neurochemical correlates of behavioural alterations
  • Dr. Tim Vanmierlo - UHasselt, Belgium
    Mechanisms of memory loss and neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee break
16.00 – 17.30 Keynote session 3: “Dopamine research”
  • Dr. Mark Ungless - Imperial College London, UK
    How do dopamine neurons respond to aversive events and stress?
  • Prof. Dr. Wim Vanduffel - KU Leuven, Belgium
    Dopaminergic control of adult cortical plasticity and perceptual learning in nonhuman primates
 17.30 Closing



This symposium is organised in the context of 'the German Year' and is partially supported by the Flemish government