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COURSE NORTH-SOUTH (1955): 2018 DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES - THE WICKED COMPLEXITY?


2018 Development Challenges- the Wicked Complexity?

The interdisciplinary course North‑South consists of a series of lectures and debates by experts on contemporary development topics in a variety of domains (e.g. education, law, international politics, architecture and planning, health, agriculture, economics and management, etc.). These topics are approached from a global relations perspective that emphasizes sustainability. The lectures make students aware of the importance of context, culture, history and experience in knowledge creation and (inter)national development strategies and practices.  The course aims to provide a broad, multidisciplinary understanding of contemporary global issues while at once stimulating students’ (self-)reflective and respectful attitude towards other cultures.

This year, the course includes lectures and debates by selected experts who will introduce you to relevant development issues in different societal fields, with a focus on the “wickedness” of these challenges. By definition, “wicked challenges” are complex, multidisciplinary and seem unsolvable.  The lectures will deal with development challenges ranging from a general introduction to the Sustainable Development Goals, tackling women and children’s health in Africa, traffic safety in the South and tax policy. We will debate about sustainable agriculture and food chains with partners from North and South. To conclude, UHasselt students who will participate in the exam, are invited for a “wicked problem plaza”: an interdisciplinary workshop on e-waste, and how to “solve” this “wicked problem”.

This course is an elective course open to all students and interested people (free of charge).

More information on the course North-South in a nutshell? Watch the video under the tab Flyer! 

 

All lectures will take place at campus Diepenbeek, Building D, from 17h-19h 

 

Thursday 22 February 2018

The Sustainable Development Goals: A Global Vision for Local Future-Proof Action 

Peter Wollaert (Managing Director CIFAL Flanders)
ROOM B104

 

Thursday 1 March 2018

Population growth in the SDG area: A demographic dividend or a demographic disaster? The case of Kenya

Prof. Dr. Marleen Temmerman (Chair Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Director Women’s Health, Aga Khan University of East Africa, Kenya, Ghent University, Belgium

 

Thursday 8 March 2018

Road safety in low and middle income countries - road safety is no "accident"

Jonathon Passmore (Technical Lead Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organisation, Western Pacific Region, Phillipines)

 

Wednesday 14 March 2018

World Evening (Cultural evening with appetizers and workshops from all over the world)

Separate online registration required @ www.uhasselt.be/Worldevening

 

Thursday 15 March 2018

Workshop Wicked Problem Plaza: E-waste

Lieselot Peeters, Sofie Ignoul. This workshop is only open for UHasselt students that will participate in the exam.

 

Thursday 22 March 2018

Addressing tax avoidance in international transactions: A South African perspective on beneficial ownership

Enelia Jansen van Rensburg (Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Stellenbosch University, South-Africa)

 

Tuesday 27 March  2018

Session “Crafting self-reflective, academic papers and presentations”

Prof. Dr. Patrizia Zanoni

 

Thursday 29 March 2018

Sustainable Farming 2.0: Challenges & Opportunities

dr. Bram Govaerts (Strategic Lead CIMMYT, Mexico),

followed by a panel discussion about “Sustainable food chains” with Tine Hens (Journalist and author "Het klein verzet"), prof. Sanjay V. Lanka (Lecturer Financial Management , Sheffield University), Jelle Goossens (Rikolto/Vredeseilanden) and Nathalie Francken (KU Leuven & Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Cooperation).

 


Academic coordination

Prof. dr. Patrizia Zanoni
Prof. dr. Paul Janssen

Administrative coordination

Sofie Ignoul

This page will constantly be updated

 

Thursday 22 February 2018: The Sustainable Development Goals: A Global Vision for Local Future-Proof Action by Peter Wollaert (Managing Director CIFAL Flanders)

At the end of September 2015, 70 years after the foundation of the United Nations, the 193 member states of the UN decided on a new and ambitious action plan for the world: 17 global ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ (2016-2030), to bring about peace and justice, based on human rights, towards social equality, care for the environment, innovative industries, … . This lecture offers an introduction to these Sustainable Development Goals and the importance of this transition-agenda, but also the possible pitfalls.

This lecture will be given to you by Peter Wollaert, UNITAR Fellow and Managing Director CIFAL Flanders. Peter Wollaert (Ghent, °1968) calls himself a ‘serial social entrepreneur’ and has worked the past 20 years – based on a social business and stakeholder model – , to strengthen international development cooperation, sustainable development, social economy, social entrepreneurship, Corporate Social Responsibility, and sustainable urban policy, in Flanders, on European level and in developing countries.

 

Thursday 1 March 2018: Population growth in the SDG area: A demographic dividend or a demographic disaster? The case of Kenya by Prof. Dr. Marleen Temmerman (Chair Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Director Women’s Health, Aga Khan University of East Africa, Kenya, Ghent University, Belgium

In 1956, Belgium had a population of 9 million, and Kenya’s population was roughly at 7 million. Today Belgium has about 11.3 million, while there are about 44 million Kenyans. Fertility levels are declining gradually and Kenyans are living longer. It is estimated that there will be 85 million people in Kenya by 2050, with three quarters of these being below 35 years. While Kenya’s median age is 19, Belgium’s is 42.

Kenya’s mushrooming population presents an extraordinary opportunity and several challenges. The opportunity lies in the potential for a so-called demographic dividend of sustained rapid economic growth in the coming decades. There is reason for optimism that Kenya can benefit from a demographic dividend within 15 to 20 years. It is estimated that Kenya’s working age population will grow to 73 percent by year 2050, potentially bolstering the country’s GDP per capita 12 times higher than the present, with nearly 90 percent of the working age in employment.

Investment in children is Kenya’s best hope to set the right pre-conditions for this potentially transformative demographic dividend. Properly harnessed, the potential of the youth could propel the country forward as a dynamic and productive engine of growth in all the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set out in 2015.

Prof Dr Marleen Temmerman is a well-recognized global leader in women, adolescent and child health and rights. She brings academic, technical, political, governance, management and leadership skills to the table as well as diplomacy, advocacy, fundraising, training and clinical expertise. She has a strong track record of working with governments, multilateral organisations, academia, professional bodies, development agencies, private sector, consultancy agencies, civil society, non-governmental and faith based organisations, in a global and changing world. She is known for strategic partnership building and communication skills and has the ability to build relationships and influence at the highest levels. She is a trust-builder with diverse groups of stakeholders, leading to innovation, creativity and strong partnerships.

Currently she is Head of Department Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Director of the  Centre of Excellence in Women and Child Health,  Aga Khan University (AKU) East Africa, based in Nairobi, Kenya.

Before she served as Director of the Department of Reproductive Health and Research (RHR) at the World Health Organization (WHO), HQ Geneva (2012-15). She was elected Senator to the Belgian Parliament (2007-12) where she served as a  member of the Commission on Social Affairs, and Chair of the Commission on Foreign Affairs and Defence. In that capacity, she was a member of the European Parliamentary Forum and Chair of the HIV/AIDS Advisory Group of the Inter-Parliamentary Union.

She is the Founding Director of the International Centre of Reproductive Health (ICRH) at Ghent University, Belgium with offices in Kenya and Mozambique and member of a large global collaborative academic network (23 universities globally). ICRH is a WHO Collaborating Centre on Reproductive Health since 2004, and a UNFPA preferential partner.  She has a strong academic background with over 500 peer reviewed publications and books in the area of women and children health and rights, family planning, HIV/AIDS and infectious diseases, and health systems. She supervised over 50 PhD students in Western- as well as Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin-America, the Middle East and China, and won several awards and honours.  She is full Professor OB/GYN at Ghent University, Belgium (currently on leave), Concurrent Professor at Fudan University, and has Honorary Professorships at the University of the Western Cape, South-Africa, the Free University Brussels, Belgium and the National Institute Family Planning Research, China.

Current important affiliations/memberships include:  Guttmacher-Lancet Commission on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the post-2015 world;  Lancet Standing Commission on Adolescent Health,  Scientific Advisory Committee of the EDCTP (European and Developing Countries Trial Partnership), as well as professional bodies.  Chair Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition; Senior advisor for the WHO Cluster ‘Families, Women and Children’, Senior Fellow in the Institute for Global Health Diplomacy in Geneva.

 

Thursday 8 March 2018: Road safety in low and middle income countries- Road Safety is no 'accident' by Jonathon Passmore (Technical Lead Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organisation, Western Pacific Region, Phillipines)

On 17 August 1896, Bridget Driscoll, the 44 year old wife of a labourer, became the United Kingdom’s (and possibly the worlds) first road traffic fatality.  Mrs Driscoll, a pedestrian, walking with her 16 year old daughter, was struck by one of only a handful of automobiles operating on London’s roads at the time, a vehicle travelling at an estimated four miles per hour.  The Coroner investigating her death is said to have stated “this must never happen again”.

Tragically road traffic crashes have continued with alarming frequency and today, more than a century later, WHO estimates that 1.25 million people are killed on the world’s roads each year making road traffic injuries the leading cause of death for persons aged 10-29 years.  The so called “vulnerable road users”, the pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists account for 49% of the total number killed. 

Road safety, the prevention of and response to road traffic injuries, is a complex science involving a variety of disciplines and jurisdictions working in coordinated collaboration including, enforcers, engineers, economists, medical practitioners, and psychologists from Transport, Health, Police, Finance and Infrastructure, just to name a few.

WHO recommends a “Safe Systems” approach to road safety.  This recognizes that the human body is highly vulnerable to energy and injury and that humans, being fallible, make mistakes, but that a set of complementary interventions, to create safer roads, safer vehicles, safer speeds, and safer behaviour by road users, work together to accommodate error.   Crashes will still occur, but injury and death must never be accepted as an inevitable consequence.

Reflective of the magnitude and the preventability of road traffic injuries, targets were included in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.  SDG target 3.6 calls for a 50% reduction in road traffic deaths and injuries by 2020.  Its inclusion in SDG 3 on good health and wellbeing, highlights that road safety is not just a transport or police issue as it is seen in many countries, but also a public health issue and most certainly an international development priority.

This lecture will be given by Jonathon Passmore. Jonathon is an Australian public health road safety and injury prevention specialist educated at the University of Western Australia (Bachelor of Science with Honours) and Curtin University of Technology (Master of Public Health and Post Graduate Diploma in Public Health).  Jonathon is an Associate Fellow of the Australasian College of Road Safety. Prior to first joining WHO, Jonathon worked for the Department of Health and Human Services in the Australian state of Victoria. Jonathon joined the WHO China Country Office in 2004 where he managed the collaborative road safety and injury prevention program for three years. Returning to Australia in 2007, Jonathon was the Manager for Major Projects (Road Safety) at the Victorian Transport Accident Commission (TAC) where he managed a range of road safety programs including police enhanced enforcement, motorcycle and vehicle safety and supported the development of TAC's internationally renowned road safety social marketing program. Jonathon returned to WHO in 2008 to coordinate the implementation in Viet Nam of the Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety, a collaborative program led by the National Traffic Safety Committee and focusing on the prevention of drink-driving and strengthening motorcycle helmet wearing , two major road safety risk factors in Viet Nam. Since 2013, Jonathon has been based in Manila at the Western Pacific Regional Office where he now coordinates all regional programs, providing technical and other support to WHO Country Offices and Member States in road safety, drowning prevention and the prevention of and response to interpersonal violence.

 

Thursday 15 March 2018: Workshop Wicked Problem Plaza: E-waste

 

Thursday 22 March 2018: Addressing tax avoidance in international transactions: A South African perspective on beneficial ownership by Enelia Jansen van Rensburg (Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Stellenbosch University, South-Africa)

 An important policy challenge for developing countries is the maintenance of their sustainable sources of revenue, including their tax bases. Questions that are increasingly being asked in public policy debates around the world on how multinational enterprises seemingly manage to pay low effective tax rates are thus important in this context.This consideration also features prominently in the joint project on base erosion and profit shifting (the “BEPS” project) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) and G20, which commenced in 2012.

 

Our discussion will focus on whether a South African court is likely to interpret the term “beneficial owner” in provisions in South African DTAs based on article 10(2) of the OECD MTC as an anti-abuse measure to combat treaty shopping.

Enelia Jansen van Rensburg (BA (Law) (University of Stellenbosch), LLB (University of Stellenbosch), LLM (Tax) (University of Cape Town)) previously taught tax law at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She is currently teaching tax law and international tax law at the University of Stellenbosch. She recently successfully defended her LLD dissertation and is expecting to receive the LLD degree in April 2018 at the University of Pretoria.

 

Thursday 29 March 2018: Sustainable Farming 2.0: Challenges & Opportunites by Bram Govaerts (Strategic Lead Cymmit, Mexico)

To prevent food scarcity, price spikes and even armed conflict triggered by a combination of adverse events that have happened separately in recent years, such as drought, flooding or crop disease propagation, Bram Govaerts advocates for game-changing science to shift from a commodities-based to a systems-based approach to food production. By adopting this outlook on rural development, the farmer brings about change and becomes the keystone of innovation networks or sustainable farming hubs. He makes a strong call for sound agronomy, crop science, inter-disciplinary research, enabling public policies and innovative public – private partnerships to help food producers drive change and bridge the gaps between conventional farming and sustainable intensification practices. Factual information from the field is presented to illustrate how these combined efforts have already produced remarkable and encouraging results in Latin America, particularly in Mexico where CIMMYT is based. The results achieved so far draw to the conclusion that sustainable intensification strategies can be adapted and replicated in many more regions overwhelmed by the challenges of rural poverty, resource degradation, growing population and climate change.

Bram Govaerts (°1979) is currently Representative of CIMMYT in America. Since 2007, Bram has coordinated CIMMYT's strategy of conservation agriculture and sustainable intensification. From 2003 to 2007, he was an assistant researcher at the Catholic University of Leuven and worked in Mexico and Ethiopia. He obtained a master's degree in bio-science engineering with specialization in soil conservation in combination with tropical agriculture at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. In 2003, he was awarded the Cooperation for Development Prize from the Federal Government of Belgium. He also received the Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, Endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation and presented by the World Food Prize Foundation.

The lecture of Bram is followed by a panel discussion about “Sustainable food chains” with
Tine Hens (Journalist and author "Het klein verzet")
prof. Sanjay V. Lanka (Lecturer Financial Management , Sheffield University)
Jelle Goossens (Rikolto/Vredeseilanden)
Nathalie Francken (KU Leuven & Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Cooperation).

Structure & language

The course consists of interactive lectures by guest speakers specialized in different areas of study. Every lecture will foresee the possibility of interaction between the speaker and the audience. All lectures will be in English.

 

Target group

  • AUHL students:
    - Hasselt University: Students in their third bachelor year and master students can register for the course (1955) with the approval of their faculty.
    - PXL: Students can register for the course with the approval of their department.
  • Others: The lectures are open to all interested people.

 

Examination:

  • Attendance at all lectures is required.
  • Participation in the discussions during the lectures is encouraged.
  • Students can choose between:
    - A 10-page essay concerning a topic which has been dealt with during the lectures. Students frame this topic within a broader perspective, adopt a critical stance in formulating their own opinion and make links to recent events on the topic.
    - Oral examination: students read a book from a given reading list and discuss 3 insights they gained from this book.

 

Contact: 
Sofie Ignoul

You will have to register for each session seperately. 

 

 


 UHasselt students

(My academic file/register for .../Course NORTH-SOUTH (1955): European Year of Development)

 

 


 UHasselt Staff members

 

 
 

Others

 

More information on the course North-South in a nutshell? Watch the video below:

After each lecture, documents (presentation, articles) will be uploaded here. 

 

Thursday 22 February 2018: The Sustainable Development Goals: A Global Vision for Local Future-Proof Action by Peter Wollaert (Managing Director CIFAL Flanders)

Presentation

References

UNSSC primer

http://www.guninetwork.org/articles/global-pressing-problems-and-sustainable-development-goals

Interesting background information

Infosheet SDG online resources 2018 Q1

http://blogs.worldbank.org/opendata/2017-atlas-sustainable-development-goals-new-visual-guide-data-and-development

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/sdi/overview

http://sdgindex.org/assets/files/2017/2017-SDG-Index-and-Dashboards-Report--full.pdf

http://businessfightspoverty.org/reports/

https://youth4globalgoals.org/

 

Thursday 1 March 2018: Population growth in the SDG area: A demographic dividend or a demographic disaster? The case of Kenya by Prof. Dr. Marleen Temmerman (Chair Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Director Women’s Health, Aga Khan University of East Africa, Kenya, Ghent University, Belgium

Presentation

References

NCPD Policy Brief: Demographic dividend opportunities for Kenya, July 2014.

Chatterjee S. With Kenya’s Youth, The Future Is Here: Invest to Reap Demographic Benefits. 

About Kenya Vision 2030

 

Thursday 8 March 2018: Road safety in low and middle income countries by Jonathon Passmore (Technical Lead Violence and Injury Prevention, World Health Organisation, Western Pacific Region, Phillipines)

References

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2015.  World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland

Save Lives : A road safety technical package. 2017.  World Health Organization, Geneva Switzerland

 

Thursday 15 March 2018: Workshop Wicked Problem Plaza: E-waste

 

Thursday 22 March 2018: Addressing tax avoidance in international transactions: A South African perspective on beneficial ownership by Enelia Jansen van Rensburg (Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Stellenbosch University, South-Africa)

Presentation 

References

  • Paragraphs 1-29 of Philip Baker’s report The United Nations Model Double Taxation Convention between Developed and Developing countries: Possible Extension of the Beneficial Ownership Concept. The report is annexed to a report of the UN’s Committee of Experts on International Cooperation in Tax Matters, available at http://www.un.org/esa/ffd/tax/fourthsession/EC18_2008_CRP2_Add1.pdf

Thursday 29 March 2018: Sustainable Farming 2.0: Challenges & Opportunites by Bram Govaerts (Strategic Lead Cymmit, Mexico)

Presentation

References